Customer Focus – Quality Principle

Organizations depend on their customers and therefore should understand current and future customer needs, should meet customer requirements and
strive to exceed customer expectations.
• Increased revenue and market share obtained through flexible and fast  responses to market          opportunities

• Increased effectiveness in the use of the organization’s resources to enhance
customer satisfaction
• Improved customer loyalty leading to repeat business.
• Researching and understanding customer needs and expectations
• Ensuring that the objectives of the organization are linked to customer needs and expectations
• Communicating customer needs and expectationscustomer
throughout the organization
• Measuring customer satisfaction and acting
on the results
• Systematically managing customer relationships
• Ensuring a balanced approach between satisfying customers and other interested parties (such as owners, employees, suppliers, financiers, local
communities and society as a whole).

http://www.iso.org

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Customer in Defining Quality

The Growing Role of the Customer in Defining Quality

Four key factors drive the intersection of customer and quality:

• The role of quality within an organization

• Integration of goals in strategic planning

• Level of transparency on quality goals and reporting

• How the quality measures are used.

It is clear that many organizations are becoming true partners with their customers in order to maximize the value for both stakeholders. Organizations’ definition of quality, the actual quality processes, and using quality measures to drive performance and culture are all closely tied to customers. Because quality and customers are so closely aligned in successful organizations, the two concepts are intersecting into a customer-centric quality culture.

While manufacturing organizations tend to use mature quality practices—in regards to governance models, availability and use of metrics, quality management frameworks and certifications, and training—do their practices include a focus on the customer? What defines a customer-centric, quality culture and what are the driving factors of its success?

To answer these questions APQC(American Productivity and Quality Center) conducted correlation analysis on data, specifically for the manufacturing industries, from American Society for Quality – The Global Sate of Quality survey conducted by APQC for ASQ. The customer-centric quality culture can be defined by four statements that elucidate the organization’s relationship with its customer around quality:

Most of the survey respondents indicated they agree with the statements. However all cultural attributes were not weighted equally. The emphasis was placed on customer service and product performance, rather than two-way engagement or quality and what it means to the customer.

source: http://www.industryweek.com

Requirements of Quality Management System

What are Requirements of ISO 9001 Quality Management Systems?

audited image1The ISO offers one among the known management systems within the world. Overall, the systems are enforced by quite one million organizations in many countries. The ISO 9001 certified company follows tips set by the organization. The standards represent the foremost comprehensive existing nowadays, and are a tried and tested framework for firms to higher make sure that they’re meeting the wants of their several purchasers.

Requirements – Documentation

In order to be ISO 9001 compliant, an authorized company giving services or product should be in possession of documented statements of a top quality policy that delineates the standard objectives.

Quality Manual

A company seeking ISO 9001 certification should possess a top ISO 9001 quality manual that sets forth the scope of the standard management system and documented procedures for addressing quality problems.

Control of Documentation

Documentation should be controlled therefore on make sure the documents are approved before being issued. Additionally, all documentation should be unbroken up-to-date. Revisions should be resubmitted for approval once an amendment is formed.

Management Responsibility

Although the ISO 9001 produces the management standards, it’s the responsibility of the corporate to self-audit. Additionally, the corporate might permit customers to perform an audit likewise. To be certified as compliant, businesses management practices should be reviewed by a freelance ISO 9001 quality system certification company.

Measurement and Analysis

Per Section eight of the ISO standards, an organization should set up and implement “the watching, measure, analysis and improvement processes” that are required to demonstrate conformity to product necessities, guarantee conformity of the standard management system, and to supply continual improvement of the standard management necessities.

Continual Improvement

In order to stay compliant with the ISO standards, an organization should frequently develop and improve its own tips to make sure corrective and preventative measures are in situ to contend with any nonconformity that will arise.

source: qms9001certificationprocedures.wordpress.com

Management Strategy

Managers and employees alike need to earn the respect of team members, colleagues and company leaders. As we all know, respect is not something that comes automatically with a job title – it must be earned. And it’s not only for the management team; every employee will achieve more success and have more confidence at work when they know they have earned the respect of their colleagues.

consulting

Here are a few guiding principles to earn respect, and build success, at work.

Listen to Your Inner Voice – Each of us makes decisions based on our personal compass of what is good or bad, right or wrong, fair or unfair. Particularly while practicing Human Resources, it seems like there are so many rules, there must be one for every situation! But more often than not, we are interpreting the law and also doing the right thing. This is where a strong moral compass is one of the best tools in your management belt.

Wait 24 Hours… Sometimes – Today we are so connected through technology and our work demands quick responses. When considering options or weighty decisions, remember you (and others impacted) will have to live with the decision much longer than it takes to make it. Although we all have to be ready to turn on a dime sometimes, do not underestimate the power of thoughtfulness.

Pick Your Battles – When working in a team environment, the decision does not always need to go your way. Respectfully agreeing with a leader or the group shows that you can successfully manage change while demonstrating adaptability.

Bring Something To The Table –Be the best you can at what you do, and don’t be afraid to speak up when you have a good idea. Make sure that you are delivering expertise the company will always value. Think constantly about your contribution to the organization and your team.

Keep Your Word – If you commit to a deliverable or a deadline, stick to it. A key element of keeping your word is proactively renegotiating a deadline in advance if you realize you will not be able to reach it. You will gain the respect of all your colleagues due to your reliability. If you come through for others, they will usually come through for you.

Be a Supportive Teammate – Managers should be develop and support their teams. Colleagues should also champion and congratulate one another on accomplishments. You will foster trust and loyalty through your own generosity.

Give Second Chances (Including to Yourself!) – Every employee – including the boss – is going to have a few missteps. When a member of the team is asked to put themselves out on a limb or try something new, they also need to feel there will be a safety net of forgiveness backing them up. Just be candid and admit when one of your teammates, or you, made a mistake, move on, and don’t let it happen too frequently.

source: http://hrservices.sharedhr.com

Leader Standard Work?

Leader standard work? Is it valuable?

Leader standard work as being fundamental to any company that is committed to continuous improvement and culture change. Leader standard work is part of what is included in third principle of manufacturing excellence, i.e., it is the disciplined use of an authorized formal system.

Typically, manufacturing companies are meticulous about creating standard work for machine operators, e.g., job instructions. The job instructions for a particular process are very detailed and represent the required behavior to produce products that meet the customer specification. I hope we always collect the operators’ input before an engineer or technician retires to the office to formalize the instructions.

 But once the job instructions have been committed to the formal system, then we don’t vote anymore about how to do this work. We expect the instructions to always be followed until and unless someone comes up with a better idea to be vetted and tested before changing the standard work and retraining the affected people.

On the other hand, the closest thing many companies have to leader standard work is the position description. Even a very well-thought-out and written position description is far too general to be used on the day-to-day responsibilities.

Leader standard work requires the commitment to detail the important responsibilities of a leader, some of which do not happen from the comfort of the office.

Leader standard work, in the case of the first line supervisor, involves having a daily plan of what the leader’s key duties are. Those might specify, for example, at least three gemba walks and dialog with each person in the area each day.

As we go up the ladder, the plan could become weekly, monthly, quarterly, etc., depending on the level in the organization. For example, a plant manager might commit to a daily gemba walk to touch base with the value stream managers, supervisors and a few hourly associates in each area just to understand how the plant is running each day, what the issues are and, yes, to be visible to everyone.

The plant manager also is behaving in a way that serves to coach people along the way. If the manager sees a potentially unsafe condition, does she walk on by or stop and engage the issue? The leader’s response will speak volumes to all those who are watching to see what happens next.

It’s a teachable moment if handled properly and helps to reinforce the new culture that would expect operators, material handlers, etc., to step up themselves rather than wait on a member of management to respond. Hourly folks typically see these things first, and we want to help them know what to do and feel confident enough to speak up and help keep their teammates safe as well as themselves.

The same kind of coaching opportunity could occur on a quality issue, schedule issue, maintenance, whatever. This important work cannot be done from the office.

The plant manager might also plan and execute a monthly “state of the business” meeting for everyone once a month. The VP of manufacturing/operations might do it quarterly along with a gemba walk. The CEO might do a video for companywide viewing on full-year results and expectations for the new year.

These opportunities to be visible and interactive provide the means to ensure that leadership’s expectations are clear for the results and behaviors that we seek.

source: http://www.industryweek.com

Global management standards

The ISO 9001 family – Global management standards (International Organization for Standardization).

 This video from the International Organization for Standardization, explores the worldwide impact on business of the ISO 9000 family of international management standards.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oq1Zi_V4KyE

TRAINING PLAN AND TRAINING REALIZATION – TRAINING NEED ANALYSIS,

choose-personIntroduction

The Quality management principles underlying the ISO 9000 family of standards (of which the ISO 10000 series form a part) emphasize the importance of human resource management and the need for appropriate training. They recognize that customers are likely to both respect and value an organization’s commitment to its human resources and its ability to demonstrate the strategy used to improve the competence of its personnel.

Personnel at all levels should be trained to meet the organization’s commitment to supply products of a required quality in a rapidly changing market place where customer requirements and expectations are increasing continuously.

This International Standard provides guidelines to assist organizations and their personnel when addressing issues related to training. It may be applied whenever guidance is required to interpret references to “education“ and “training“ within the ISO 9000 family of quality assurance and quality management standards. Any references to “training“ in this document includes all types of education and training.

An organization’s objectives for continual improvement, including the performance of its personnel, might be affected by a number of internal and external factors including changes in markets, technology, innovation, and the requirements of customers and other stakeholders. Such changes may require an organization to analyse its competence-related needs. Figure 1 illustrates how training could be selected as an effective means of addressing these needs.

Training Need Analysis, Training Plan and Training Realization

Training can be described as “the acquisition of skills, concepts or attitudes that result in improved performance within the job environment”.

Training is process to provide and develop knowledge, skills and behaviours to meet requirements” (ISO 10015 Clause 3.2)

Training analysis looks at each aspect of an operational domain so that the initial skills, concepts and attitudes of the human elements of a system can be effectively identified and appropriate training can be specified.

Training analysis as a process often covers:

  • Training Analysis is most often used as part of the system development process. Due to the close tie between the design of the system and the training required, in most cases it runs alongside the development to capture the training requirements

Training Analysis (sometimes called Training Needs Analysis (TNA)) is the process of identifying the a gap in employee training and related training needs.

Training Needs Analysis (TNA) is defined as the “Identification of training requirements and the most cost effective means of meeting those requirements”.

A TNA should always be performed where a major new development in policy, equipment acquisition or procedures is deemed to have potential impact upon the current training regime.

What is ISO 10015?

The ISO 10015 Quality Standard for Training is a sector specific quality assurance system. It focuses on training processes at the workplace.

ISO 10015 complements ISO 9001 Standard and further elaborates on the clause 6.2.2 — “Awareness, Competence and Training” and gives clear guidance for its implementation.

The role of this ISO 10015 International Standard is

  • to provide guidance that can help an organization to identify and analyse training needs,
  • design and plan the training,
  • provide for the training,
  • evaluate training outcomes,
  • and monitor and improve the training process

in order to achieve its objectives.

It emphasizes the contribution of training to continual improvement and is intended to help organizations make thier training a more effective and efficient investment.

Scope of ISO 10015

This standard cover the development, implementation, maintenance, and improvement of strategies and systems for training that affect the quality of the products supplied by an organization.

This International Standard applies to all types of organizations.

It is not intended for use in contracts, regualtions, or for certification.

It does not add to, change, or otherwise modify requirements for the ISO 9000 series.

This International Standard is not intended to be used by training providers delivering services to other organizations.

Training providers may use this International Standard when addresing the training needs of their own personnel.

Source: www.ngusuyasa.wordpress.com

Conducting Audits: Science or Art:

contact:  kris@themanagementsystems.com

Conducting Audits can be a Science but Meaningful Audits is an Art:

  • Identifying missing elements and obvious     audit image6noncompliance/nonconformances is easy,
  • Identifying what is good and/or done right is necessary but difficult,
  • Identifying nonconformances to the intent of the standards or ineffective processes and activities is  difficult in a working environment,
  • Separating the trivial (observations and findings) from the Important takes judgement and experience,
  • Lecturing about audit conduct and policy is easy,
  • Asking the right questions is harder,
  • Getting people to talk and listening to what they have to say can be difficult,
  • Establishing credibility (audit has value) is an art, it must be earned,
  • Maintaining control of the audit without turning off communications takes leadership,
  • Separating fact from fancy takes experience; reliance on objective evidence, 
  • Making recommendations to resolve findings & observations is not good audit practice:          – Lack of familiarity with the process and practice                                                                                – Lose objectivity and become part of the problem,
  • Making suggestions that would stimulate resolution is recommended, where necessary.
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