Customer in Defining Quality

The Growing Role of the Customer in Defining Quality

Four key factors drive the intersection of customer and quality:

• The role of quality within an organization

• Integration of goals in strategic planning

• Level of transparency on quality goals and reporting

• How the quality measures are used.

It is clear that many organizations are becoming true partners with their customers in order to maximize the value for both stakeholders. Organizations’ definition of quality, the actual quality processes, and using quality measures to drive performance and culture are all closely tied to customers. Because quality and customers are so closely aligned in successful organizations, the two concepts are intersecting into a customer-centric quality culture.

While manufacturing organizations tend to use mature quality practices—in regards to governance models, availability and use of metrics, quality management frameworks and certifications, and training—do their practices include a focus on the customer? What defines a customer-centric, quality culture and what are the driving factors of its success?

To answer these questions APQC(American Productivity and Quality Center) conducted correlation analysis on data, specifically for the manufacturing industries, from American Society for Quality – The Global Sate of Quality survey conducted by APQC for ASQ. The customer-centric quality culture can be defined by four statements that elucidate the organization’s relationship with its customer around quality:

Most of the survey respondents indicated they agree with the statements. However all cultural attributes were not weighted equally. The emphasis was placed on customer service and product performance, rather than two-way engagement or quality and what it means to the customer.

source: http://www.industryweek.com

The Role of Quality

The Role of Quality

 As organizations evolve quality from merely being a ‘checking the compliance boxes’ to really using quality practices to impact and empower staff to make improvements and address customer needs, there is opportunity for a greater return on investment and improved customer satisfaction. Organizations that use quality as a source of competitive advantage, operational excellence, or as a continuous improvement activity are much more likely to embrace the customer-centric, quality culture.

For example organizations that use quality as a source of competitive advantage are more likely to make their quality measures transparent to their customers (76.4%) than those who use it as a compliance activity (46.6%). This is particularly true for understanding what defines culture from the customer’s perspective.

Integration in Strategic Planning

To understand what’s truly valuable to the organization, one has to look at what makes it into the strategic plan. Although there is always intrinsic value in the use of quality goals and measures within an organization, it is when these goals are established across the organization—corporate, management and support services, and operational businesses and functional units—that quality can have the greatest impact on overall performance.

Level of Transparency

Transparency on quality measures helps create buy-in on quality management and enables employees to understand what role quality plays in how they do work, how they can impact quality, and its effects on their customers’ satisfaction. Transparency breeds accountability at the most basic level and even drives a healthy competition between business units. It also tends to increase knowledge-sharing opportunities (e.g., best practices or lessons learned), as managers with lower performance often reach out to managers in groups with higher performance, even across diverse products and services within the same organization.

Use of Quality Measures

The majority of respondents use quality measures to set goals that will drive higher performance throughout the organization (76%), for predictive analysis to identify potential opportunities or issues in their operations and business process (66%), and as part of their variable-performance compensations (61%). However organizations that include quality measures to drive higher performance or for operational improvement are more likely to agree with the customer-centric, quality cultural statements. This adoption indicates that the organization has embraced the quality culture and it’s simply now how they do business.

source: http://www.industryweek.com

ISO 9001:2008 to ISO/DIS 9001 Correlation Matrix

What to expect in new revision of ISO 9001? ISO 9001

ISO 9001:2008 to ISO/DIS 9001 (rev.2015) Correlation Matrix

ISO 9001:2008 ISO/DIS 9001
4        Quality management system 4         Quality management system
4.1     General requirements 4.4     Quality management system and its processes
4.2     Documentation requirements 7.5     Documented information
4.2.1  General 7.5.1  General
4.2.2  Quality manual 4.3     Determining the scope of the quality management system

7.5.1  General

4.4     Quality management system and its Processes

4.2.3  Control of documents 7.5.2  Creating and updating

7.5.3  Control of documented Information

4.2.4  Control of records 7.5.2  Creating and updating

7.5.3  Control of documented Information

5         Management responsibility 5        Leadership
5.1      Management commitment 5.1     Leadership and commitment

5.1.1  Leadership and commitment for the    quality management system

5.2      Customer focus 5.1.2  Customer focus
5.3      Quality policy 5.2     Quality policy
5.4      Planning 6        Planning for the quality management system
5.4.1  Quality objectives 6.2     Quality objectives and planning to achieve them
5.4.2  Quality management system planning 6        Planning for the quality management system

6.1     Actions to address risks and opportunities

6.3     Planning of changes

5.5      Responsibility, authority and communication 5        Leadership
5.5.1   Responsibility and authority 5.3     Organizational roles, responsibilities and  authorities
5.5.2   Management representative           Title removed

5.3     Organizational roles, responsibilities and  authorities

5.5.3   Internal communication 7.4     Communication
5.6      Management review 9.3     Management review
5.6.1   General 9.3.1  Management review
5.6.2   Review input 9.3.1  Management review
5.6.3   Review output 9.3.2  Management review
6         Resource management 7.1     Resources
6.1      Provision of resources 7.1.1  General

7.1.2  People

6.2      Human resources           Title removed

7.2     Competence

6.2.1   General 7.2     Competence
6.2.2  Competence, training and awareness 7.2      Competence

7.3      Awareness

6.3      Infrastructure 7.1.3  Infrastructure
6.4      Work environment 7.1.4  Environment for the operation of processes
7         Product realization 8         Operation
7.1      Planning of product realization 8.1      Operational planning and control
7.2      Customer-related processes 8.2      Determination of requirements for products and services
7.2.1  Determination of requirements related to the product 8.2.2  Determination of requirements related to products and services
7.2.2  Review of requirements related to the product 8.2.3  Review of requirements related to the products and services
7.2.3  Customer communication 8.2.1  Customer communication
7.3      Design and development 8.5      Production and service provision
7.3.1  Design and development planning 8.3      Design and development of products and services

8.3.1  General

8.3.2  Design and development planning

7.3.2  Design and development inputs 8.3.3  Design and development Inputs
7.3.3  Design and development outputs 8.3.5  Design and development outputs
7.3.4  Design and development review 8.3.4  Design and development controls
7.3.5  Design and development verification 8.3.4  Design and development controls
7.3.6  Design and development validation 8.3.4  Design and development controls
7.3.7  Control of design and development changes 8.3.6  Design and development changes
7.4      Purchasing 8.4      Control of externally provided products and services
7.4.1  Purchasing process 8.4.1  General

8.4.2  Type and extent of control of external provision

7.4.2  Purchasing information 8.4.3  Information for external providers
7.4.3  Verification of purchased product 8.6      Release of products and services
7.5      Production and service provision 8.5      Production and service provision
7.5.1  Control of production and service provision 8.5.1  Control of production and service provision

8.5.5  Post-delivery activities

7.5.2  Validation of processes for production and service provision 8.5.1  Control of production and service provision
7.5.3  Identification and traceability 8.5.2  Identification and traceability
7.5.4  Customer property 8.5.3  Property belonging to customers or external providers
7.5.5  Preservation of product 8.5.4  Preservation
7.6      Control of monitoring and measuring equipment 7.1.5  Monitoring and measuring resources
8.0      Measurement, analysis and improvement 9.1      Monitoring, measurement, analysis and evaluation
8.1      General 9.1.1  General
8.2      Monitoring and measurement 9.1      Monitoring, measurement, analysis and evaluation
8.2.1  Customer satisfaction 9.1.2  Customer satisfaction
8.2.2  Internal audit 9.2      Internal audit
8.2.3  Monitoring and measurement of processes 9.1.1  General
8.2.4  Monitoring and measurement of product 8.6      Release of products and services
8.3      Control of nonconforming product 8.7      Control of nonconforming process outputs, products and services
8.4      Analysis of data 9.1.3  Analysis and evaluation
8.5      Improvement 10       Improvement
8.5.1  Continual improvement 10.1   General

10.3   Continual Improvement

8.5.2  Corrective action 10.2   Nonconformity and corrective action
8.5.3  Preventive action            Clause removed

6.1       Actions to address risks and opportunities (see 6.1.1, 6.1.2)


Understanding Change in a Quality Culture

Clock with time for change written on itIn any improvement process, managing the influence of change and the anti-change culture that will continually try to raise its head will be one of the most ardent tasks. Learn to deal with this as effectively as you do the project management itself. There are many well-written books on the subject of change in every category of change that you could imagine. Below is a compiled list of items about change that are relevant to implementing process change.

When examining change it is necessary to understand the stages of change that have been identified. It is interesting to note that these stages take place in varying degrees in different people, but are exactly the same whether the change is a different process in the workplace or the death of someone close. You should be able to identify and deal with the levels of acceptance encountered. Here are the stages and some tips on how to deal with them.

Denial

A wonderful self-preservation response. It is characterised by minimising the situation, and saying (or thinking) things like “This isn’t happening”, “It won’t help”, and “There’s no problem.” You may find the person will avoid talking about the situation, or even make up excuses for not attending meetings.

  • Explain the denial to commitment process that you went through to get where you are.
  • Present the situation openly and allow a lot of time for questions and answers.
  • Have a training session on change management.
  • Present a caring and understanding front. Though this may not be your normal attitude, during this process it will be invaluable.
  • Be a broken record with memos, thank you emails, posters, or anything else that presents your platform in a positive light.

Resistance

It is at this stage that you may see the active signs of sabotage. They may be passive, as in “I’ll just do it my way anyway”, along with a lot of whining-crabbing about the new systems. Or they may manifest in physical methods of sabotage depending on the character of the person. Be aware that these are real threats to the success of any project. But for the most part, those who fall into this category will show a lack of interest and a lot of time spent on finding reasons it won’t work.

  • Listen! And I mean listen. You can hear more in the tone and inflection of what is being said as well as the body language than you can imagine.
  • Solicit Response. People love to know that they are being heard and even more that their suggestions are valid. Many of them are. These are the people who will make or break the installation, let them know they have input to the outcome.
  • Acknowledge Feelings. Let them know you went through a similar process in getting where you are. Validate that they are not alone.

Exploration

People will begin to see some of the good that may occur in the situation, and will generally vacillate between thinking that it might be ok and that it is still a bad idea. But, the up side is that you are beginning to get them on your side and they will begin to make effort to get the changes in place.

  • Facilitate. People are more open at this point. Take advantage of it. Be your own commercial! Challenge people to find a better way within the new system. It gets them thinking about the next round of change and off the current.
  • Reward forward thinking with mounds of compliments. Praise the desired behaviour.
  • Seek out new possibilities. Have brainstorming sessions. It does wonders for everyone’s moral.

Commitment

You’ve got buy-in and will see productivity through the changes. People can see the bigger picture and the opportunity that the change affords.

When dealing with this from a management point of view, it is important to remember several things. These feelings are very real and they happen at different times for different areas of the organisation. Do not expect to spend several months agonising over the commitment to purchase expensive software only to turn around and expect everyone else to do a Tarzan swing from denial to commitment in a week. Remember the process you had to get through in order to accept the change. Others will require the same; allow the process to manifest itself in others. You can facilitate the process by understanding it and helping others to get through.

  • Recognise and acknowledge those who get there. Give them more opportunity to improve the process and celebrate their victories.
  • Inspire people to get others on board. Teach them about the process and how to recognise the people in various stages and how to move them along.
  • CELEBRATE!!!!! Most important. When you have achieved goals, let everyone know and celebrate, celebrate, celebrate. When people know their efforts will be recognised and appreciated, you will have fewer problems in future change.

Remember that we have a tremendous amount of information to process every day. There is more information in a single daily paper today than a person in the 15th century processed in a lifetime. Change takes form in one of three types; that which we cannot control, that which we can, and that which we can influence. Being positive and trying to move things from cannot control to can influence helps in the ability to manage the changes that occur. But, there will always be those things you cannot control and acceptance of that fact is the only road to remaining sane.

Source: http://www.projectsmart.co.uk ,  John W. Wright III

Key: Quality Management Plan

The Quality Management Plan defines the acceptable level of quality, which is typically defined by the customer, and describes how the project will ensure this level of quality in its deliverables and work processes. Quality management activities ensure that:

  • Products are built to meet agreed- upon standards and requirements
  • Work processes are performed efficiently and as documented
  • Non-conformances found are identified and appropriate corrective action is taken

quality

Quality Management plans apply to project deliverables and project work processes. Quality control activities monitor and verify that project deliverables meet defined quality standards. Quality assurance activities monitor and verify that the processes used to manage and create the deliverables are followed and are effective.

Quality Plan Components
The Quality Management Plan describes the following quality management components:

  • Quality objectives
  • Key project deliverables and processes to be reviewed for satisfactory quality level
  • Quality standards
  • Quality control and assurance activities
  • Quality roles and responsibilities
  • Quality tools
  • Plan for reporting q uality control and assurance problems

Rationale/Purpose
The purpose of developing a quality plan at the Stage 3 level is to elicit the customer’s expectations in terms of quality and prepare a proactive quality management plan to meet those expectations.

The Quality Management Plan helps the project manager determine if deliverables are being produced to an acceptable quality level and if the project processes used to manage and create the deliverables are effective and properly applied.

Who is involved
Project Manager
Project Team
Customer
Project Sponsor

Result
Quality Management Plan segment of the Project Plan

Management Strategy

Managers and employees alike need to earn the respect of team members, colleagues and company leaders. As we all know, respect is not something that comes automatically with a job title – it must be earned. And it’s not only for the management team; every employee will achieve more success and have more confidence at work when they know they have earned the respect of their colleagues.

consulting

Here are a few guiding principles to earn respect, and build success, at work.

Listen to Your Inner Voice – Each of us makes decisions based on our personal compass of what is good or bad, right or wrong, fair or unfair. Particularly while practicing Human Resources, it seems like there are so many rules, there must be one for every situation! But more often than not, we are interpreting the law and also doing the right thing. This is where a strong moral compass is one of the best tools in your management belt.

Wait 24 Hours… Sometimes – Today we are so connected through technology and our work demands quick responses. When considering options or weighty decisions, remember you (and others impacted) will have to live with the decision much longer than it takes to make it. Although we all have to be ready to turn on a dime sometimes, do not underestimate the power of thoughtfulness.

Pick Your Battles – When working in a team environment, the decision does not always need to go your way. Respectfully agreeing with a leader or the group shows that you can successfully manage change while demonstrating adaptability.

Bring Something To The Table –Be the best you can at what you do, and don’t be afraid to speak up when you have a good idea. Make sure that you are delivering expertise the company will always value. Think constantly about your contribution to the organization and your team.

Keep Your Word – If you commit to a deliverable or a deadline, stick to it. A key element of keeping your word is proactively renegotiating a deadline in advance if you realize you will not be able to reach it. You will gain the respect of all your colleagues due to your reliability. If you come through for others, they will usually come through for you.

Be a Supportive Teammate – Managers should be develop and support their teams. Colleagues should also champion and congratulate one another on accomplishments. You will foster trust and loyalty through your own generosity.

Give Second Chances (Including to Yourself!) – Every employee – including the boss – is going to have a few missteps. When a member of the team is asked to put themselves out on a limb or try something new, they also need to feel there will be a safety net of forgiveness backing them up. Just be candid and admit when one of your teammates, or you, made a mistake, move on, and don’t let it happen too frequently.

source: http://hrservices.sharedhr.com

Objectives of Quality Management System Certification

Objectives of Quality Management System Certification

ISO 9001(1)1QMS standard may be a set of quality management tips that are adopted by thousands of organizations round the world. It provides processes and procedures to assist corporations improve the standard of the merchandise or service they supply. So as to attain ISO accreditation, businesses have to be compelled to demonstrate to meet variety of objectives for effective QMS implementation.

Senior Management Commitment

Effective Quality Management System requires that the complete commitment and backing of senior management may be a very important component of achieving ISO accreditation. While not the complete support of the senior management team, the creation and implementation of quality management systems and processes can lack the impetus needed to form them winning. This will increase the chance that any enforced procedures will quickly fail, so compromising quality.


Design Process

ISO 9001 states that everyone comes should be planned completely and with quality as a priority in any respect stages within the life cycle of the merchandise, from style to manufacture to maintenance. Any changes or alterations within the style of the merchandise have to be compelled to be QMS 9001 documentation and recorded, and therefore the data of the amendment communicated to any or all relevant parties.


Supplier Vetting

It may be requirements of QMS 9001 that every one new supplier is completely vetted before any contracts are awarded. This is to determine the standard of service and products that the provider can give; similarly as guaranteeing that they need the resources necessary to satisfy your demand. This can lead to long and productive operating relationships with suppliers.


Inspection and Testing

All materials and product utilized in the creation and producing of an item should be completely inspected before use. This is often to confirm that they’re fit purpose, and every one testing records should be maintained and filed. Before a product is free to the general public, it should endure final testing and attain the sign-off of senior management.

Internal Audits

All businesses seeking QMS certification should do regular and thorough internal audits to check that the processes and procedures that are enforced among the corporate are operating and being well maintained. Any shortcomings, discrepancies or areas of improvement should be communicated to senior management and a point in time given for any issues to be corrected.

Total Quality Management Strategies: Advantages & Disadvantages

Total Quality Management Strategies: Advantages & Disadvantages

Total Quality Management is a system of continuous improvement that involves all workers in a business from upper management to production line workers. The focus of the improvement program is to improve customer service and reduce waste in the business. Quality improvement teams use problem-solving techniques and analysis to identify and eliminate weaknesses in the company.
2_1_1_photo

Production Disruption

Implementing a Total Quality Management system in a company requires extensive training of employees. The employee training includes instruction in problem solving techniques and the tools to evaluate a process and identify weaknesses such as statistical process control, Pareto diagrams and brainstorming techniques. During the initial training period, productivity can decline. Meetings for quality improvement teams also take workers away from their duties, which also reduce productivity. While the improvements do reduce lead time, eliminate waste and improve productivity, the beginning stages of implementing Total Quality Management in an organization can reduce worker output.

Lowers Production Costs

A Total Quality Management program eliminates defects and waste, which reduces production costs in a business. As teams gather to identify and eliminate weaknesses in the business, the company continues to enjoy reduced costs and higher profit. Quality improvement teams can eliminate defects, reduce lead time and identify redundancies in the production process that can significantly add to the profit the company earns.

Employee Resistance

Total Quality Management requires change in mindset, attitude and methods for performing their jobs. When management does not effectively communicate the team approach of Total Quality Management, workers may become fearful, which leads to employee resistance. When workers resist the program, it can lower employee morale and productivity for the business. Total Quality Management uses small incremental improvements to move the business forward. It can take years for a company to enjoy the benefits of the program.

Employee Participation

Once workers understand their participation and involvement in Total Quality Management is essential to its success, morale and productivity improve. Workers become empowered through participation on quality improvement teams. Businesses can improve morale further by recognizing improvement teams that make meaningful changes in the production process to reduce or eliminate waste.

source: http://smallbusiness.chron.com  by  Luanne Kelchner, Demand Media

Leader Standard Work?

Leader standard work? Is it valuable?

Leader standard work as being fundamental to any company that is committed to continuous improvement and culture change. Leader standard work is part of what is included in third principle of manufacturing excellence, i.e., it is the disciplined use of an authorized formal system.

Typically, manufacturing companies are meticulous about creating standard work for machine operators, e.g., job instructions. The job instructions for a particular process are very detailed and represent the required behavior to produce products that meet the customer specification. I hope we always collect the operators’ input before an engineer or technician retires to the office to formalize the instructions.

 But once the job instructions have been committed to the formal system, then we don’t vote anymore about how to do this work. We expect the instructions to always be followed until and unless someone comes up with a better idea to be vetted and tested before changing the standard work and retraining the affected people.

On the other hand, the closest thing many companies have to leader standard work is the position description. Even a very well-thought-out and written position description is far too general to be used on the day-to-day responsibilities.

Leader standard work requires the commitment to detail the important responsibilities of a leader, some of which do not happen from the comfort of the office.

Leader standard work, in the case of the first line supervisor, involves having a daily plan of what the leader’s key duties are. Those might specify, for example, at least three gemba walks and dialog with each person in the area each day.

As we go up the ladder, the plan could become weekly, monthly, quarterly, etc., depending on the level in the organization. For example, a plant manager might commit to a daily gemba walk to touch base with the value stream managers, supervisors and a few hourly associates in each area just to understand how the plant is running each day, what the issues are and, yes, to be visible to everyone.

The plant manager also is behaving in a way that serves to coach people along the way. If the manager sees a potentially unsafe condition, does she walk on by or stop and engage the issue? The leader’s response will speak volumes to all those who are watching to see what happens next.

It’s a teachable moment if handled properly and helps to reinforce the new culture that would expect operators, material handlers, etc., to step up themselves rather than wait on a member of management to respond. Hourly folks typically see these things first, and we want to help them know what to do and feel confident enough to speak up and help keep their teammates safe as well as themselves.

The same kind of coaching opportunity could occur on a quality issue, schedule issue, maintenance, whatever. This important work cannot be done from the office.

The plant manager might also plan and execute a monthly “state of the business” meeting for everyone once a month. The VP of manufacturing/operations might do it quarterly along with a gemba walk. The CEO might do a video for companywide viewing on full-year results and expectations for the new year.

These opportunities to be visible and interactive provide the means to ensure that leadership’s expectations are clear for the results and behaviors that we seek.

source: http://www.industryweek.com

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